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DIY Series: Home Projects for 2017

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DIY Series: Home Projects for 2017

This year I am doing Lara Casey's Power Sheets, which I LOVE by the way! I intended to do a whole post on my goals for the year but you know work and 10-Ks and coordinating a move with our church to a new building and ski season have just really taken over... Maybe I will do one later this month though. Anyways, one of my goals is of course home projects for the year. In Denver, everyone goes dormant in the winter then as April starts to come around the whole city kicks it into over drive and does a TON of home improvement projects. The rush is real. Contractors just stop caring and are so over booked there is a wait list of like 6 weeks just to get a bid, it is really something else. Each year I try to start getting bids in March so I can get on the schedule for renovations.

Ben and I had our annual meeting to discuss our house to dos so we can stay focused this spring and summer and accomplish our goals! Here is what we have narrowed down the list to:

  • Bathroom
    • Full gut and renovation (I am so excited... I already have two contractors scheduled to come out this Friday to give us quotes)
    • See my inspiration here!
  • Basement
    • Replace the carpet with vinyl wood-esque flooring
    • Do something with our exposed brick wall (yes, yes I know everyone loves it in theory but its not sanitary, it is crumbling, and just not really practical... We are probably going to put up dry wall.)
    • Fix the windows
    • Paint all of the doors, trim, and ceiling with fresh white paint
    • Paint the rest of the walls grey
  • Paint the front door & fix a piece of glass that has been broken since we bought our home
  • Paint front porch ceiling with a fresh coat of white paint and switch out our old light fixture
  • Backyard
    • Re-seed & re-vitalize our grass (unfortunately it died and dried up last year after we sodded)
    • Expand our garden by building some raised garden beds (SO excited about this!!)
    • Refinish deck (the Colorado sun is so intense!)
    • Organize storage under our deck
    • Setup our outdoor fire pit
    • Purchase an electric smoker (Ben is beside himself he is so excited about this... he at one point was telling me we could smoke 100 lbs of meat... Good LORD.. what are we gonna do with 100 lbs of meat!!)
  • Front yard
    • Re-fresh our front yard flower bed areas by pulling up our old rose bushes
    • Re-vitalize our grass and mud patch (we finally killed all the weeds but now its just dirt)
    • Pull up and replace a ginormous prickle bush by our porch
  • Miscellaneous
    • Patch some wall areas around our new Nest and light switch plates then touch up the paint
    • Replace our old smoke detector with the Nest CO2 and smoke alarm
    • Replace the light fixture in the entry way
    • Replace the light fixture in the hallway to our bedroom
    • Poly the handrail & post
      • This is leftover from last summer and really we have just been procrastinating like its nobody's business and could easily do this before the spring/summer arrives.

I will keep you updated with our progress this year. Our next plan is to finalize our timeline and budget for each of these projects!

Planning is my middle name -

Chelsea
 

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DIY Series: Backdoor & Storm Door

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DIY Series: Backdoor & Storm Door

Since we have moved into this house we have had heating and air condition problems. It is a 1910 home and we are lucky to even have HVAC in Denver. Most friends do not have this luxury. We have no insulation in our house. Like zero. Behind this plaster is brick.. well hopefully (wink wink). In one instance, we removed the baseboard to the left of the door and we were able to see straight outside. This was also the case next to the pantry. (No wonder there was once a mouse problem...) Our food would be COLD, like icicle cold, in the winter in our old pantry. We wanted to get this door and door jam repaired since it is original to our home but unfortunately the door was just too warped. Look at the top left corner of the door. It was bowing out significantly and we were able to literally see outside at all times. This created a bug problem and also our house was losing air quickly. Throughout the last 100 years or so, this door faced the elements and the storm door was offering little to no protection at this point. So it was concluded we needed to replace the original back door (cue Nicole Curtis yelling at me...) and my dad graciously gifted us a new storm door & installation for a house warming present.

Funny story: When we first bought our house my step mom came in town to help us with a few projects. When she first got here we went to Home Depot to purchase supplies for the weekend projects and I was asking Ben for a new storm door because the one originally at the house would slam shut so loud and it actually ripped several pieces of clothing because it was broken. This was week 2 of owning our first home and Ben was like "No! We can't spend all our money right now!" haha soo my step mom told my dad this story when she got home because real adult life set in for us. Since that day my dad has been set on gifting us a storm door!

This sound so silly but I have been absolutely so excited about this! You will see why below but the full glass allows for this mini indoor/outdoor feel that I just love when having guests over to sit on the back porch under the twinkle lights! Also I like to leave it open when I am cooking to look outside and get all the natural light possible! It even has a self closing mechanism so NO MORE SLAMMING! I LOVE LOVE LOVE this the most about the new storm door. Anyways back to the back door...

Here is a before shot from inside our kitchen. Looking back on it, the door was rough.

I really wanted to keep the integrity of the home and this meant ordering a custom wood door. We went to The Door Store in Denver and their prices were really reasonable (actually WAY cheaper than Home Depot) and they had a style that was really close to our original door. The only detail we lost was the look of the 4 windows. I truly like the all glass because again it lets in more light and I can look outside unobstructed.

This is the day our contractor installed the new door!

I will get into a few other problems we had with the door that are common with old homes and shows you just how much craftsmanship went into this from our contractor. You can see above that the concrete slab under the door was crumbling. Also the deck is right up against the doorway so this causes water to pool up against the house. In addition, the wood around the transom was rotted. Basically we needed help. Our contractor suggested that he could add concrete to stabilize the door below the new threshold, he could add another picture window in front of the original transom to increase energy efficiency and he could install some decking to redirect water away from our house. No sooner than he discussed this with us, we had a major rain and hail storm in Denver. The water came pouring in our kitchen on the newly finished hardwood floors. We had cardboard all over the floors to protect them and the water soaked underneath and to top it all off our floors are of course uneven so we were in a scramble to clean up all the water in the kitchen. Thankfully we were home and heard the water gushing in so we were able to act fast. Once we thought that we had averted this crisis, we went to the basement and there was water everywhere in our office. Oh joy. So we decided we should proceed with making some additional repairs to this back door area to reduce the risk of future water issues. We absolutely do not regret this add on to our project.

Next it was time to pick a door color. We decided that we wanted something bright and fresh for the door. Because why not? On Snapchat I asked friends to weigh on what color to pick. Ultimately we decided to go with the far left color. My signature turquoise... Ben keeps calling it green. I highly disagree. (wink, wink)

After we painted the door, our contractor installed our new storm door! Isn't it beautiful? It has a feature where you can pull down the glass halfway and it turns into a screen. This is so nice to have in Denver. I pretty much leave the back door open all the time now! You can also see the new grey decking that diverts water and snow from the doorway.

After installation of the door, this is what the inside looked like. I was insistent that we keep the original molding around the door so it looked quite rough right after installation. We caulked and painted all the molding and it changed the look of this door dramatically. I was also insistent that we keep the original door handle. However, the latch was very old and a weird shape so we found an online shop that sells antique hardware parts that would allow us to still use our doorknob but were smaller in overall size so wouldn't threaten the integrity of the new door. Door knobs are so complicated! The metal stick that actually turns the door open is a 5/16" square pole. This is not the standard anymore. But luckily for about $25 we were able to order a new inside piece from House of Antique Hardware. I learned a lot about door handles and latches through this process. We specifically ordered this one. This website has tons of great info and I went to the glossary often to determine exactly what we needed and called their customer service #. They were great to work with!

Below is an in progress shot of the finishing details. Again it is so amazing what a fresh coat of paint can do for your space! Cheapest way to freshen it up!

After:

Some of my favorite elements about the backdoor project are:

  • Buying a traditional wood back door from the Door Store and painting it a fun color! We didn't lose the charm of the old house.
  • Keeping the original doorknob (We just replaced the inner latch hardware through House of Antique Hardware, which has parts for old door knobs and sells antique hardware.)
  • Replacing the light switch plates with fresh, clean ones from Wall Plates Online. (Found lovely mouse poop when I took the old wall plate off.)
  • Putting a fresh coat of white paint on all the trim around the door and in the kitchen to really clean it up!
  • Adding a fun and eclectic rug from West Elm!

P.S. Sorry you can see me in the reflection in ALL of these pictures haha. 

Chelsea
 

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DIY Series: Painting Our House

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DIY Series: Painting Our House

As I begin to write this post, I am overwhelmed just thinking of where to start with the planning process and the actual doing process. I just want to disclaim that without our neighbors, there is just no way that Ben and I would have been able to do this anytime soon. They literally taught us everything we needed to know and on top of that actually acquired all of the paint. One of the neighbors works for a well known paint store so he knows the drill.

We started by painting 7 different colors on the side of the house to see what color we liked best. My biggest tip for this is 1) Do NOT skip out on this step! Colors look so different on the surface you are going to be painting and you can really get an idea of what it is going to look like. 2) I created a numbering system so that we could easily match the color on the house to the paint can. This was extremely helpful. I labeled the paint tins 1-7 then put little pieces of painter's tape with the corresponding number above each color as we painted.

Here are all the colors we were looking at. We have a craftsman bungalow - so we ended up choosing 5 colors total. I will get into more detail on that later.

Here are all the colors we were looking at. We have a craftsman bungalow - so we ended up choosing 5 colors total. I will get into more detail on that later.

We decided to go with the dark color on the right for the body of the house. We liked the color on the left for the window trim but decided to mix a slightly lighter color for contrast.

We decided to go with the dark color on the right for the body of the house. We liked the color on the left for the window trim but decided to mix a slightly lighter color for contrast.

As I mentioned earlier - we used approximately 5 colors on the actual house - I may be missing one? haha 

  • Base color of the house: Dark Grey
  • Window Trim & Ledges: Light Grey
  • Window Detail: Red
  • Beams: Dark Brown 
  • Ceiling on the Porch: White (with a silver tint)
  • Oh and our deck is blue... now I just need to pick an accent color for the front and back door! Ideas anyone?

Supplies (This is probably not a full list because you always need something else but it is pretty comprehensive):

  • 15-25 paint brushes of varying sizes (We had so many different colors we really used all of these and will probably purchase a few more before we are finished. Also you can always take back the unused brushes.)
  • Rollers + Roller Brushes (We uses 9 inch rollers)
  • Paint tin + inserts for the same size rollers you purchase (The inserts are great for easy cleanup)
  • Several mixing sticks
  • Hammer & screw for opening and closing paint
  • 2-5 5 gallon paint buckets with lids (We used these for cleaning brushes, mixing colors, & spraying the side of the house.)
  • Brown paper (You can find this in the paint section.)
  • Exterior painter's tape (this is much stronger than the indoor paint)
  • Plastic for windows
  • Towels for cleaning up messes (I have a pack of 20 or so from Home Depot for about $7)
  • Power Drill + drill bits (This is to take off storm windows, mail boxes, and anything else that you may encounter.)
  • Brick & Mortar Sealer

We decided to make the main day of painting a party! Ben and I made breakfast burritos and had mimosas ready for our neighbors and our sweet friends, the Baldocks! We somehow convinced Cole & Anna to come and help us for about 8 hours worth of painting an attempting to mount a TV (we will get into that another day! - its not quite funny yet.) We are beyond thankful for their friendship and community.

Ben really loves sausage and onions

Ben really loves sausage and onions

Brunchin'

Brunchin'

 
From Right to Left: Cole, Anna, Me, & Ben (also pictured - Anthony in the background!)

From Right to Left: Cole, Anna, Me, & Ben (also pictured - Anthony in the background!)

 
Our neighbor Rob - rented a sprayer and painted the front of the house in about 1 hour.

Our neighbor Rob - rented a sprayer and painted the front of the house in about 1 hour.

In Progress and a complete mess... but it is our mess!

In Progress and a complete mess... but it is our mess!

 
Ben painting the side of the house!

Ben painting the side of the house!

 

Prep Work: As you can see there is some white paint on the brick. This was where the previous paint had started to bubble. We scraped the paint off then painted a brick and mortar sealer over it prior to painting. In addition, we laid brown paper along the side of the house so that we could spray right up to the edge. We also painted the windows with plastic & used outdoor painter's tape to ensure that no paint got through to the actual window pane. Prep work is important! It is definitely not my favorite, I am so impatient but it is so critical. Also - we painted everything the dark grey and just went over any other details afterwards with the correct colors on the actual window detail.

Before - The day we put a bid on our home.

Before - The day we put a bid on our home.

After/Still In Progress - We still have some more window detail to work on but it is coming along and we are beyond thrilled to see this transformation!

After/Still In Progress - We still have some more window detail to work on but it is coming along and we are beyond thrilled to see this transformation!

Before - You may recognize this photo from the  D  IY Series: Painting the Deck  post!

Before - You may recognize this photo from the DIY Series: Painting the Deck post!

After

After

To be completely honest - we still have several windows that need to be finished with the detail painting and we are working on those in our free time! We committed to each other that the house projects would not completely take over spending quality time with our families & friends. So we take breaks and circle back to it when we are able. The Craftsman style  has a lot of detail on the windows that we are free handing. There is damaged wood and so many other little nuances that slow us down! But for now - there is no more green on our house! Hallelejuah.

  • Number of neighbors who have come over to say they are glad they no longer have to look at the "hideous green": 6+
  • Number of people who honk and throw us the thumbs up as we are painting: 1
  • Number of happy people leaving in a grey house: 4 + 1 puppy

Livin' in the grey zone -

Chelsea
 

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DIY Series: Painting the Deck + Fence

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DIY Series: Painting the Deck + Fence

Our deck was in semi rough shape. The bones were in pretty good shape but the paint/stain was peeling off, it was an ugly orange color, there was a broken flower box, & a severely warped board. We did some research and decided on the Behr Deck Over paint. The commercials had me at dancing on the deck with bare feet & the bright blue color! Check it out below:

 
 

Before:

Below are some pictures of our deck before we painted it! We had some crazy weather {hail + lots of rain} all throughout June here in Denver so we had to clean off our deck multiple times before it was actually paint ready.

Deck - Before 1
Before - Deck 2
Deck - Before 5
Deck - Before 6
Before - Deck 3
Deck - Before 4

In Progress:

We somehow suckered my in-laws into helping us paint our deck on Father's Day, which happened to be the same week they re-stained their entire deck at the cabin. We are so thankful them & their willingness to help us with all our dirty projects! haha 

Y'all - let me just say that Behr Deck Over paint is AMAZING but main is it thick! The main process for this project was fairly simple but time consuming & takes some preparation:

  1. Blow off leaves & debris with an electric blower {may need to use a broom for some of the debris}
  2. Power wash or spray off the deck {depending on the condition}
  3. Let the deck dry for at least 24-48 hours
  4. Check the forecast to make sure there is no rain in the forecast for at least 24 hours after you paint
  5. Tape off corners & areas as necessary {i.e. the side of our house on the top part of the deck}
  6. Get to painting every nook & cranny - just make sure to leave yourself an exit strategy so you can make it back inside the house when you are done! We started at the back door and worked our way down the stairs

Supplies Needed for Painting:

  • Paint tray + throw away liners
  • 9 inch rollers with multiple roller brushes {We used 3/8 nap but I recommend consulting with a Home Depot paint expert prior to buying.}
  • Roller extender
  • Several 3-4 inch paint brushes
  • Large bristle brush to sweep off small areas prior to painting {Like this one}

We had lots of fun while painting //

In Progress 1
In Progress 2
In Progress 3
In Progress 4
In Progress 5
In Progress 6
In Progress 7
In Progress 8
 
Blue Deck - In Progress
 

Lessons Learned:

  • Behr Deck Over paint dries FAST - If multiple people are painting then each person should have their own paint tray or bucket to use
  • Behr Deck Over paint is THICK - Wear something you don't care about & expect to go through a lot of brushes & rollers
  • Decks + fences are very time consuming to paint & I recommend convincing some friends or family to come and help!

If you decide to paint your deck & fence - I pray that you will have at least as much help as we did! It is a lot more time consuming than you would think. It took us another few days to finish cutting out the corners, gate, hardware, & doing touch ups. It is by no means perfect but it looks so much better than it did before! We love our Cowboys blue deck. What is not to love about a lime green house with yellow trim & a blue deck?

After:

Deck - After 1
Deck - After 2

Paintin' all day everyday -

Chelsea
 

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DIY Series: Basement Closet

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DIY Series: Basement Closet

Background

When we bought our 1910 Bungalow - we had a slight mice problem. By slight I mean - I never actually saw a live mouse running through our home but when moving the appliances in the kitchen we found one dead mouse & several thousand droppings. This lead me to go a little overboard. I have since sanitized where the old appliances were - 3 times, including the entire kitchen and house, we got all new appliances, spent over $400 on a critter company to come and seal up the outside of the foundation, and did one very not so pretty weathering strip replacement DIY on the door leading to the back yard. The last piece of this creature maintenance plan was to seal up all of the closets. This also sounded appealing to make our closets feel more finished rather than exposed. Specifically the basement closet was exposed to the crawl space. The basement was finished sometime in the last 10-20 years and although there is dry wall on the walls, there was no dry wall on the ceiling of the basement bedroom closet. 

 
The white pipes were either a shower curtain or a curtain rod that was just resting on the dry wall and being used to hang clothes on. That was just not going to work for me! Also - see random cords & the exposed light bulb & electrical above the sliding doors. The overall closet just appeared to be very exposed for us.

The white pipes were either a shower curtain or a curtain rod that was just resting on the dry wall and being used to hang clothes on. That was just not going to work for me! Also - see random cords & the exposed light bulb & electrical above the sliding doors. The overall closet just appeared to be very exposed for us.

 

Research

First - we thought we could do the entire dry wall repair ourselves - quickly found out this was above our skill grade since the ceiling would require installing additional support beams for us to screw into and also see large duct work that needed to be worked around. Also Ben and I have NO dry wall experience whatsoever.

Second - we decided to get bids on this project to out source the dry wall installation. This was a whole project in of itself. Contractors just operate differently than the "corporate business world" so we had some problems with getting timely responses on bids, people to call us back, scheduling estimates, etc. After receiving about 3-5 estimates, we decided to go with a referral that was the lowest bid overall. Overall, we had 3 closets & one hole behind a cabinet in the kitchen that needed to be fixed (also a part of the mouse situation). Two closets just needed some dry wall to seal the framing from the inside of the closet so that it was not open to the attic or crawl space, the basement bedroom closet needed the ceiling to be sealed, & the behind the kitchen cabinet needed repair. We received bids ranging from $1,200 to $660 for all of these projects. The bid we selected was $660 - which included $600 of labor & $60 for materials. Overall this felt expensive to us because we are new to this renovation game. 

I am going to focus on the basement closet project since that was the most involved project.

Contractor

We had two options for the ceiling: 1) have a stair step for the ceiling line or 2) have a slanted ceiling line. We chose the slanted roof line because it was cheaper, would be faster, & it seemed the easiest. {Looking back I am SO happy we went with this option! It turned out great. I was very skeptical at first but the cost really swayed me into selecting the slanted ceiling line.} We had some difficulties with coordinating the electrical piece of this project. Our house is very old, therefore, people are hesitant to touch anything to do with the electrical and our contractor was not insured for electrical work. Therefore, Ben would have to do a few of the steps related to moving & upgrading the light fixture. Overall - Ben said the electrical was not the difficult. He had no prior experience and relied solely on our friends at Home Depot and a few blog tutorials, as well as, the light fixture package directions. Our main hiccup was that the closet light is not linked to a light switch so we had to have a fixture that allowed us to pull the string. Definitely not my favorite but DIY-ing is not about perfection on every project! Sometimes we sacrifice one thing because the cost & effort is much more than you are able to do at the time. We have a priority listing & the light works for now!

Total Cost: $660 + approximately $30 for the light fixture & supplies

Painting

Once the dry wall was complete we decided that we were going to paint the closet a dark grey. If you look at the pictures below, you will see that painting the entire closet was a must. I had read on some blogs that it is the *new trend*. {haha - everything is a "new trend"!} It helps cover up scuffs on the walls, is visually appealing, & a small way to provide some pop in your room! We extended this color to the accent walls for a cohesive look. Our closet has sliding doors so it was difficult to find a good stopping place.

The basement was painted in varying shades of neutral white/yellow but the more I looked at the wall the more things I noticed about the paint job. The must have just run out of paint in the corners or something? Also the paint was in a shine-y/satin finish and I prefer matte.

Since this was fresh dry wall with uneven surfaces - we used a sanding sponge to even out the surfaces like this one. This was a quick process. I recommend not pushing too hard and just running the sponge over all of the surfaces and then running your hand over it to ensure it is smooth. After sanding the walls - we wiped down the walls and base boards with a rag so that there was no more dust on the surfaces.

 
You can see where the new dry wall interceded with the old coat of paint. Also our light is so bulky because we had to have a cord to pull. Long story short - our electrical was not setup for this light to be linked to a light switch.

You can see where the new dry wall interceded with the old coat of paint. Also our light is so bulky because we had to have a cord to pull. Long story short - our electrical was not setup for this light to be linked to a light switch.

 
This is the extra mudding that was left over that we sanded down to get a smooth surface.

This is the extra mudding that was left over that we sanded down to get a smooth surface.

Picture of the bumpy surface after the mudding was complete.

Picture of the bumpy surface after the mudding was complete.

Hint: I recommend laying down a painting tarp before sanding so that it will catch the majority of the dust. This can get quite messy.

Next - we taped off the entire closet and baseboards. We used Behr Premium Plus - Paint & Primer in one. This is the cheapest Behr option but does require at least 2 coats. I love the way the color turned out. When DIYing - you just have to pick & choose where you are going to splurge. The paint in the closet & basement accent wall was not one of those areas for me and this paint turned out just fine!

Total {approximate} Cost:

  • Paint - $30
  • Brushes - $15
  • Roller & Roll Brushes (4 inches) - $15 (I used by roller from the DIY Series: Painting Steps project)
  • Sanding Sponge - $8
  • Paint Tray - $10 (I used this from previous projects & I use the throw away inserts for easy clean up!)
Closet after we finished painting

Closet after we finished painting

Extension of the accent wall

Extension of the accent wall

Installing the Rod & Shelf

Here comes the hard part. We needed to install a shelf & rod. One would think that this is a fairly simple & straightforward process.... but only if you have a standard or new build closet. We have a not very wide, shallow closet with a slanted ceiling & rather bulky light fixture. We went to Home Depot and after must deliberation we finally decided on a plan that would allow us to hang clothes & store other items on the shelf.

Rod: The rod is installed from wall to wall supported by wall flanges & one bracket with a support hook.

  • 48-72 in Adjustable Closet Rod from Home Depot - $10.96
  • Heavy Duty wall flanges pair from Home Depot - $6.79
  • Wall bracket with hook from Home Depot - $7.96

Shelf: The shelf is slightly shorter than the width of the closet (closet width is 54 inches - shelf width is 48 inches) and is low enough that we can get some baskets & items on top but high enough so that clothes are not dragging on the floor or the shoe organizer. So much to think about! 

  • 12 in wide by 48 in long Rubbermaid shelf in grey laminate from Home Depot  - $9.48
  • 2 Wall brackets (no hooks) from Home Depot - $6.86 x 2 = $13.72
  1. We installed the brackets by screwing them into studs against the back wall. We used a stud finder and marked the center of the stud with a pencil at the appropriate height and used a pencil to mark the spot. Before screwing in the bracket - we made sure the entire bracket was level on top & to the side to make sure it is completely straight. We installed the left bracket, right bracket, & then middle bracket the same way.
  2. We installed the shelf by screwing the top of the bracket into the bottom of the shelf. We made sure that the shelf was centered on the brackets & confirmed it was level.
  3. We then put the rod on the middle bracket, and measured where the rod would be on each wall, confirming that it was level. We marked the appropriate area on each wall to install the flanges then slid in the rod. 
  4. Finally we added back our sliding closet doors and added all of our winter clothes & other junk and wa-laaaa it was done!

Each closet is so different but the main things to keep in mind are:

  1. Screw in the brackets & wall flanges on studs so that the shelf and/or rod does not just rip out of the wall after you put all your stuff on it. (You will probably need to buy a stud finder - you can find a decent one for about $20.)
  2. Use an impact drill & level. Throughout the entire process we made sure that the brackets, shelf, & rod was still level.
  3. Before installing the rod, test the location to make sure that hangers fit on the rod without any "nifty maneuvering". It would be easy to install the rod in a position that has clothes sticking out of the closet or jammed up against the back wall. The position of each item is crucial for a functional closet.

Final Product

 
Finished closet {without sliding door}!

Finished closet {without sliding door}!

 
 
Basement Closet - Finished 2
 

We are so glad this project is done! It was the project that seemed to drag on for a long time. Closets are not the most exciting but they sure are useful. Having this functional closet has made a huge difference in our organization system & has given me peace of mind about critters jumping out of the crawl space! haha I am not sure if this is even possible but I just wanted to make double/triple sure!

Happy DIY-ing

Chelsea
 

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